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CURRICULUM

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Students in the comparative literature program pursue a broad literary education that is informed by critical theory and knowledge of comparative methodologies. The study of comparative literature is flexible and interdisciplinary. It may involve art, music, politics, philosophy, history, anthropology and other fields. The program also engages the student with at least one culture and language other than English. The program rests on three principles: foreign language training, individual curricular planning, and comparative methodology.

The comparative literature program offers both a disciplinary and interdisciplinary major (B.A.) and minor.


COURSE LIST

If you'd like to view a full listing of our course options in comparative literature or any other subject, please visit the Online Course Catalogue.

Click for the Course Catalogue

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Requirements for the disciplinary Major (B.A.)

disciplinary, 12 courses

ENG 200, a course designated as a comparative literature seminar, and 10 courses in literature or an allied field that form a cohesive program and include one course in critical theory. The courses selected must provide a coherent and indepth exploration of the field. The number of nonliterary courses must be approved by the adviser and coordinator. Students majoring in comparative literature must also demonstrate proficiency in an ancient or modern language, typically by taking two language courses at the 200-level or above (these may be in different languages).

Requirements for the disciplinary Minor

disciplinary, 7 courses

ENG 200, a course designated as a comparative literature seminar, and five courses in literature or an allied field that form a coherent and indepth exploration of the field. Students minoring in comparative literature must also demonstrate proficiency in an ancient or modern language, typically by taking two language courses at the 200-level or above (those may be in different languages).

Requirements for the interdisciplinary Major (B.A.)

interdisciplinary, 12 courses

ENG 200, a course designated as a comparative literature seminar, and 10 courses in literature or an allied field that form a cohesive program and include one course in critical theory. The courses selected must include work in at least two different departments and include materials and approaches other than literary. The number of nonliterary courses must be approved by the adviser and coordinator. Students majoring in comparative literature must also demonstrate proficiency in an ancient or modern language, typically by taking two language courses at the 200-level or above (these may be in different languages).

Requirements for the interdisciplinary Minor

interdisciplinary, 7 courses

ENG 200, a course designated as a comparative literature seminar, and five courses in literature or an allied field from at least two different departments which include materials and approaches other than literary. Students minoring in comparative literature must also demonstrate proficiency in an ancient or modern language, typically by taking two language courses at the 200-level or above (these may be in different languages).

COURSES

Our students choose from a variety of introductory and advanced courses, each designed to provide students with a deep understanding of comparative literature.

Below, you'll find a sampling of some of our classes, as well as suggestions for making comparative literature a part of your larger interdisciplinary experience at Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

ENG 101 Introduction to Literary Studies

Class

Become familiar with the study of literature and narrative form, through detailed readings of a variety of literary works from diverse cultures, periods, and genres. Then, switch gears and try your hand at ENG 260 Creative Writing.

ENG 223 Environmental Literature

Class

Read essays and poems by contemporary American nature writers who concern themselves with the human experience of and in relation to nature. Discover how these writers evoke the American landscape while contemplating the modern environmental crisis and exploring the meaning of nature in our lives personally, philosophically and ethically. Next, explore literature around the world in ENG 246 Globalism and Literature.

ENG 304 Feminist Literary Theory

Class

Learn about feminist literary theories and critical practices by exploring issues such as female sexualization, representations of violence and madness, and subjectivity. Then, try HIST 208 Women in American History.