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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Professor Pinto and Professor Joseph

Professor Pinto and Professor Joseph

Requirements for the French and Francophone Studies Interdisciplinary Major (B.A.)

interdisciplinary, 14 courses

Two FRE 240-level courses; two FRE 250-level courses to be taken before the senior year; two FRE 300-level courses; two French & Francophone Studies electives selected in consultation with the adviser. Six courses from other disciplines selected according to the interdisciplinary area of concentration chosen in consultation with the adviser.

All courses numbered FRE 226 or above count for the major. The major consists of eight departmental courses and six courses from other disciplines. Upon declaring this major the student selects and area of concentration. No more than one French/Francophone literature/culture course taught in English may count toward the major. Students must also complete the senior portfolio requirement.

Requirements for the French and Francophone Studies Interdisciplinary Minor

interdisciplinary, 6 courses

One FRE 240-level course; one FRE 250-level course to be taken before the senior year; two courses in other disciplines approved by the adviser; two additional French & Francophone Studies courses selected in consultation with the adviser.

No more than one French/Francophone literature/culture course taught in English may count toward the minor.

COURSES

Our students choose from a variety of introductory and advanced courses, each designed to provide students with an understanding of the language and cultures of French-speaking countries.

Below, you'll find a sampling of some of our most popular crosslisted courses, as well as suggestions for making French and Francophone Studies a part of your larger interdisciplinary experience at Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

MUS 203 Baroque and Classical Music

Class

Baroque Instruments

This course applies a sociological analysis to the major trends shaping business in the United States and worldwide by focusing on issues of demographic effects, ethical concerns, technology, government, and producers and consumers. Next, enroll in ECON 221, Population and Society, where you will study population within concepts of mortality, family demography and the environment.

ART 255 French Roots of Modernism

Class

The Flag of France

Learn how to analyze the family as a social institution that is embedded in particular historical contexts, which reflects broad economic change, cultural shifts and political movements. Then, assess how our society cares for those who cannot care for themselves; such as children, the elderly and the sick in ECON 122, The Economics of Caring.

HIST 301 The Enlightenment

Class

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, French Philosopher

Many people in the West no longer believe in the divine rights of monarchs or the literal meanings of ancient religious texts, but find meaning in civil society, material life, and science, and uphold the sanctity of human equality, which they experience through relatively unrestrained access to various news media, conversations held in accessible social spaces, and schooling premised on the belief that education and experience shape the human mind. How responsible is the 18th-century movement of rigorous criticism and cultural renewal known as “the Enlightenment”? Students examine its coherence as a movement, its major themes and proponents, its meaning for ordinary people, its varied interpretations, its spread throughout Europe and beyond, and the more sinister cultural institutions and projects that many Enlightenment figures were reluctant to interrogate.