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Hobart and William Smith Colleges

MINI COLLEGE COURSES

SATURDAY | 9.22

Morning Sessions 9:15 – 10:15 a.m.

D. Brooks McKinney - Geoscience
“Geology and Upstate Cobblestone Architecture”
While cobblestone buildings are not unique to Upstate New York, there are more cobblestone buildings and a greater range of cobblestone architectural styles in the area around Geneva than anywhere else in the country. The local abundance of these handsome 19th century buildings is the result of two factors: the shift from subsistence-- to market--based agriculture that followed the success of the Erie Canal, and the area’s bedrock and glacial geology. This class will provide a quick primer on cobblestone construction, cobblestone architectural styles, and some of the underlying history of this distinctive regional architecture. (Stern 103)

Neil Laird - Geoscience
“Weather Disasters of 2011-2012”
Few topics capture the public’s attention and fascination like weather disasters. The awesome power of severe weather and the devastation and destruction it causes often form lasting impressions for many years. Hurricanes, hailstorms, tornadoes, snowstorms, ice storms, wind storms, floods, heat waves and other severe weather disasters occur worldwide on a daily basis. Some of these events make the national news; however, many do not. Never-the-less these weather disasters impact individuals, communities, governments, and economies – indeed the course of history itself.

Virtually everyone on earth is affected by severe weather during their lifetime, and almost everyone is curious about how and why severe weather develops. With this course, Neil Laird hopes to open the doors to an understanding of severe weather and allow you, the student, to develop an appreciation for its complexities and power. This course will introduce several weather disasters that occurred in 2011 and thus far in 2012, and we’ll discuss the factors that were important to their formation and significant impact. (Stern 301)

Susan Pliner and Amy Forbes - Centennial Center for Leadership
“The Power of an Idea: Entrepreneurial Leadership”
Entrepreneurs are drivers of innovation. Leaders are the primary force behind change. Together, they can offer powerful solutions to the complex challenges found in today’s world. Contemporary leaders across all professions must navigate tumultuous environments where change is rapid, discontinuous and unpredictable. Innovation, creativity and an ability to add value by solving problems are necessary. The Centennial Center for Leadership believes in the capacity of a liberal arts education to provide that training. Join us for a workshop where we will discuss entrepreneurial leadership and the ways in which professionals can leverage core tenets from the liberal arts, such as problem solving, intellectual ingenuity and calculated risk-taking. (Coxe 8)

Chris Button - Senior Project Manager, Buildings & Grounds
“Building HWS - How Design and Construction Happens”
This class will walk you through how the planning, design and construction process happens. We’ll start by looking back to our architectural beginnings and discuss how the past shapes the future. Next we’ll look at how master planning efforts have helped us stay the course, informed our growth and given us freedom to envision the future. We will then discuss the design process as it relates to a liberal arts campus, including stakeholders, consensus building and a focus on major themes. Finally, we’ll end with a history of the last 10 - 15 years of change on the campus. (Stern 204)

Michael Tinkler - Art
“Greek Architecture/Greek Revival”
After 15-20 minute talk about Greek Architecture/Greek Revival, we will move to the Quad for an exercise in laying out the monuments of the Acropolis – the Parthenon, the Caryatid porch, and the Temple of Athena Nike. (Demarest 14)

Nan Crystal Arens - Geoscience
“What’s New on Mars?”
In early August 2012, NASA landed its most ambitious robot explorer yet on the Red Planet. The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity is a car--sized rover charged with exploring rocks deposited during Mars’ very early history, when the climate was warm and water was abundant on the surface. Curiosity will explore the chemical conditions revealed by those ancient rocks to see whether they match those required for life. She will search for signs of organic molecules that might suggest life and maybe find a fossil or two. This talk will report and explain the latest results from the Curiosity mission and encourage you to think about what it means to us here on Earth. And if something goes wrong and the mission fails, we’ll talk about that too! (Coxe 7)

Lester Friedman - Media and Society Program
“Bite Me: The Enduring Legacy of Spielberg’s Jaws”
Jaws became the first movie to crack the $100 million mark and spawned a merchandizing frenzy; its box office success changed the way studios marketed and distributed their products, and it jumpstarted the summer movie phenomenon. But why did Spielberg’s big fish story capture the imagination of the American public in 1975, and why does it continue to engage audiences in the 21st century? This class will explore the Jaws saga from multiple perspectives, including interpretations, production background, major themes, visual highlights, and the film’s place in American cinema history. Scenes will be shown to illustrate these ideas. (Stanford Room)

John Marks - History; Curator, Geneva Historical Society
“How Railroads Shaped Geneva”
From 1841 to the 1960s, railroads played a vital role in Geneva. They promoted industry, brought a wider range of consumer goods to town, and brought new cultural groups, as well. The lasting influences of the railroads can be seen everywhere in Geneva, if you know where to look. (Stern 201)

Rob Carson - English
“De-Facing Shakespeare”
Does it matter what Shakespeare looked like? Does anything change when we put a new face on him? The 2009 discovery of a “new” portrait of Shakespeare gives us an opportunity to assess the strange status that Shakespeare holds in our culture and to explore what is at stake when we set out to redefine an icon. (Stern 203)

Afternoon Sessions 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Iva Deutchman - Political Science
“The 2012 Election”
In the fall of 2012, Mark D. Gearan and I are teaching, for the third time, a class on the presidential election. They did this for the first time in 2004 and again in 2008. So for this discussion I will share with you some of what they are talking about in class. Obvious questions are: What do Gearan and Deutchman make of election 2012? Everyone wants to know, of course, whether or not Obama will be re--elected. Equally important is the fate of the House and the Senate. Especially now, with men like Richard Lugar denied his party’s (Republican) nomination because he isn’t conservative enough, there are real issues being appropriately raised about party polarization. Deutchman will touch on all these issues in the brief time we have together. (Geneva Room)

Nicholas Metz - Geoscience
“Weather Disasters of 2011-2012”
Few topics capture the public’s attention and fascination like weather disasters. The awesome power of severe weather and the devastation and destruction it causes often form lasting impressions for many years. Hurricanes, hailstorms, tornadoes, snowstorms, ice storms, wind storms, floods, heat waves and other severe weather disasters occur worldwide on a daily basis. Some of these events make the national news; however, many do not. Never-the-less these weather disasters impact individuals, communities, governments, and economies – indeed the course of history itself.

Virtually everyone on earth is affected by severe weather during their lifetime, and almost everyone is curious about how and why severe weather develops. With this course ,Neil Laird hopes to open the doors to an understanding of severe weather and allow you, the student, to develop an appreciation for its complexities and power. This course will introduce several weather disasters that occurred in 2011 and thus far in 2012, and we’ll discuss the factors that were important to their formation and significant impact. (Stern 301)

Jamie Bolendos - Psychology
“Coping with Stress: A Mindfulness Approach”
Stress is a normal part of our lives. When stress becomes excessive, it can have negative effects on both physical and mental health. In this session, we will review the theoretical perspectives on how stress affects health, effective ways to cope with stress, and mindfulness-based stress reduction as one way to manage stress. (Coxe 8)

Thierry Torea - French and Francophone Studies
“How Do We Learn Languages? What is New? What Works?”
Successful language learning relies on a complex mix of cognitive and meta--cognitive learning strategies that each one of us possesses. Activboard is an interactive whiteboard that seems to be the most promising instructional strategy right now to enhance foreign language learning and to tap into those cognitive and meta- cognitive learning strategies. Its kinesthetic (tactile) capabilities allow the students to physically manipulate syntax (word order) to reinforce the learning process. Thierry Torea will demonstrate via several hands--on activities what works best when using Activboard. (Barron Room)

Susan Pliner and Amy Forbes - Centennial Center for Leadership
“Global Leadership and Intercultural Competence”
Global leaders are not simply individuals who hold global positions. Rather, they are change agents who are engaged in the process of influencing a global community to work towards shared visions and common goals. The challenges that shape the work of leaders within a global context can be frequently characterized by a multiplicity, an interdependence, great ambiguity as well as a steady state of flux. Join us as we discuss the complexities of leading from a global perspective and how emerging competencies, such as adaptation, collaborating, architecting and systems thinking, are critical as our boundaries expand and our global communities become increasingly connected. (Stern 303)

Jo Beth Mertens - Economics
“The Economics of Baseball”
Are those players really overpaid? Without the anti-trust exemption the game would die, right? And don’t forget the effects of stadiums on local economic development. ... Forget about those dry economics lectures—learn about the effects of monopoly and market power, politics and public policy, by examining America’s pastime—Baseball! (Stern 201)

Charles Temple - Education
“Storytelling and Critical Thinking”
Critical thinking is often defined as acts of making claims and supporting them with reasons, of examining other people’s arguments, and looking at issues from fresh perspectives. Storytelling is an enjoyable way to lay out questions for people to think about. In this session, we will tell a few stories, talk about them, and find out what we think. In the process we will demonstrate how we use storytelling in workshops around the world to promote critical thinking, especially through the Open Society Institute’s critical thinking projects in Central Europe, Central Asia, and South America; also in CODE-Canada’s literacy projects in West and East Africa. (Stern 103)

Laurence Erussard - English
“King Arthur: Myth, Reality and Cultural Need”
The purpose of this class is to explore the emergence and development of the legendary figure of King Arthur. Few medieval or even ancient and modern figures have had such a vivid and continued hold on the imagination as do Arthur and his knights of the Round Table. But, did Arthur exist? Who was he? What kind of hero was he? When, how, and why did his legends appear and develop? Will he come back from Avalon? These are some of the questions we will try to answer. (Stern 204)